Where We Work

We leverage partnerships across corporate, government, and nonprofit sectors to support low-income New Yorkers in all five boroughs. Together, we're creating a platform for possibility.

Where We Work

 

 

ReadNYC

ReadNYC is United Way of New York City’s collective impact initiative to improve grade-level reading by third grade for children living in some of our City’s most-challenged communities.

IMPACT INSIGHTS

94 Kindergarten–2nd grade students participated in a five-week summer program in partnership with East Side House Settlement and Read Alliance (95% increased their reading level, 43% by at least one academic year, and 35% read at or above grade level by the end of the five-week program).

316 Kindergarten–2nd grade students received literacy tutoring from Read Alliance during the 2014–15 school year (97% increased their reading level, 55% by at least one academic year, and 25% read at or above grade level by the end of the program).

100% engagement from six ReadNYC school principals in the Instructional Leadership Professional Learning Community in partnership with Safir & Associates.

758 Pre-Kindergarten–5th grade students received dental screenings in partnership with Colgate Bright Smiles, Bright Futures—every student was screened by a dental professional and any student with severe or emergency dental problems received follow-up services with a dental provider.

14 parents completed a six-week English as a Second Language program in partnership with Mercy Center (93% of parents who finished the program made language gains).

825 ReadNYC families, Mott Haven residents, and 16 community-based organizations, received direct services or capacity building support to increase financial empowerment. Services included tax preparation assistance, benefits screening, and financial counseling conducted in partnership with the Financial Clinic, Ariva, and BronxWorks.

RESULTS INCLUDE:

  • 825 returns were filed for households with an average income of $16,000 / year
  • $589,379 in total refunds
  • 224 participants received an Earned Income Tax Credit, totaling $499,139
  • 49 staff were trained as coaches
Income

UWNYC creates support networks between community-based organizations and New Yorkers in need. Last year, our Emergency Food and Shelter Program (EFSP) and our Food Support Connections (FSC) program allocated $5.2 million of federal, state, corporate and private funding toward the immediate and long-term food and housing stability of our neighbors.

 

 

 

Food Support Connections

In partnership with New York State and seven community-based organizations, FSC provides resources for individuals and families to get screened for and enroll in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Last year, FSC distributed over $1.4 million to New Yorkers living in food-insecure households. SNAP has generated more than $276 million in economic activity for New York City’s under-resourced communities.

Emergency Food & Shelter Program

EFSP supplements the work of pantries, kitchens and shelters assisting New York City residents who are facing economic emergency. In 2013–14, EFSP directly funded 183 agencies that aided 300 emergency food and shelter programs. Of this funding, nearly $800,000 in emergency rent, mortgage and utility assistance helped families and individuals prevent homelessness.

CollegePath

Designed as a unified pilot initiative across four markets in the Tri-State Region, UWNYC launched CollegePath in July 2013 to provide a lifeline to low-to-moderate income (LMI) families to help them afford their child's college education. CollegePath employed a coordinated data-driven strategy that gave LMI families the asset-building and money-management skills needed to meet the financial demands of college educations. CollegePath especially served families enrolled in our GPS-NYC program.

Self-Sufficiency Standard

UWNYC awarded the Women’s Center for Education and Career Advancement (WCECA) $75,000 to develop the Self-Sufficiency Standard Report, which examined how much income NYC households of diverse composition and location need to make ends meet. UWNYC sat influentially on the report’s steering committee to drive and shape the analysis and policy recommendations.

Health

UWNYC locally administers the New York State Department of Health’s Hunger Prevention and Nutrition Assistance Program (HPNAP). This program provides funding, training and operational support to 400+ pantries and soup kitchens in NYC. The UWNYC HPNAP team holds these providers to high nutritional standards to ensure that they are serving heart-healthy and vitamin-rich foods to New Yorkers in need. Last year, UWNYC managed over $5 million in HPNAP funding.

 

 

 

Emergency Food Grants

UWNYC’s emergency food grants ensured 379 emergency food program sites received high-quality, wholesome foods that met nutritional standards across fiber, sodium and fat. These program sites reported serving approximately 59 million meals.

Local Produce Links

Local Produce Link (LPL), a farm-to-food pantry program gets fresh produce to low-income communities. Last year, area farmers delivered 280,868 pounds (75% organic) of harvested produce to 49 participating pantries.

Workshop Series

Annually, UWNYC runs 12–15 workshops that train over 250 representatives from emergency food program sites in food protection, pantry management and cooking with fresh produce to improve the health and nutrition status of people needing food assistance.

Operation Support

Operation support funding, including capital equipment, is key to the success of our emergency food program partners. Last year, this funding supplied vital resources such as food service paper and disposable products, transportation, staff cost, utilities and space, as well as staple kitchen equipment, including freezers, refrigerators and stoves.

 

Capacity Building

UWNYC’s Capacity Building team helped strengthen the community-based organizations across education, income and health around the city. Our BoardServeNYC program, together with investment in the Change Capital Fund and other learning opportunities, extended crucial infrastructure support and strategic guidance to fellow nonprofits.

Last year, our small grants helped cover and defray costs for partner organizations to attend nonprofit sector conferences, allowing staff at all levels to learn best practices in the social and human services sector.

Sponsorships for the Staten Island Not-for-Profit Association Annual Nonprofit Capacity Building Conference and the Better Business Bureau’s annual symposium brought more than 200 nonprofit leaders together professional development opportunities.

 

 

BoardServeNYC

Through placement support, customized coaching sessions and training workshops, UWNYC placed 78 new boards members onto 58 nonprofit boards, strengthened board governance practices for 92 boards and 247 board members, and educated 193 potential board candidates. These efforts impacted the organizational infrastructure of 133 NYC nonprofits.

Change Capital Fund

As an active member of the Change Capital Fund collaborative, UWNYC’s $75,000 contribution assisted five community development organizations upgrade their strategies and develop new business models to address persistent poverty more effectively. Additional Technical Assistance helped each initiative identify the tracking systems they would need to better understand and demonstrate their results.

 

Hurricane Sandy

UWNYC provided $1,788,274 to 25 grantees in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Staten Island and Queens to rebuild the capacities of community-based organization partners in Coney Island, the Rockaways, St. George, Port Richmond, Graniteville, New Dorp Beach, Richmond Parkway, City Hall, Midtown and Red Hook.

 

UWNYC builds strong foundations for children to help them develop into successful adults who contribute to their communities. In 2013–14, key programs included ReadNYC and Graduate, Prepare, Succeed (GPS-NYC), which instrumentally impacted reading proficiency for young children, as well as attendance and graduation rates for high school students. We also supported the Child Care and Early Education Fund.
In NYC, 8 out of 10 low-income children can’t read on grade-level. In 2013–14, UWNYC launched ReadNYC, our signature collective impact campaign for grade-level reading, to address this critical issue. Our first target community was Mott Haven in the South Bronx. With our anchor-partner East Side House Settlement and 28 other local organizations, we defined our goals for improving early-childhood literacy in that community. We also launched Once Upon a Summer, a summer reading initiative, and boosted parent engagement through Read and Rise, a bilingual parent-literacy program.
In response to the NYC high school dropout crisis, Graduate, Prepare, Succeed (GPS-NYC) served more than 5,500 students during the school year. This initiative that we developed in partnership with the NYC Department of Education (DOE) and community-d partners helped students improve their attendance by providing academic interventions, attendance services and family outreach.
The Child Care and Early Education Fund supports policy and systems’ change efforts that impact the entire city. It strengthens and provides supports to public systems (governmental services) that serve children ages 0-5 in all five boroughs.
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UWNYC locally administers the New York State Department of Health’s Hunger Prevention and Nutrition Assistance Program (HPNAP). This program provides funding, training and operational support to 400+ pantries and soup kitchens in NYC. The UWNYC HPNAP team holds these providers to high nutritional standards to ensure that they are serving heart-healthy and vitamin-rich foods to New Yorkers in need. Last year, UWNYC managed over $5 million in HPNAP funding.
UWNYC’s emergency food grants ensured 379 emergency food program sites received high-quality, wholesome foods that met nutritional standards across fiber, sodium and fat. These program sites reported serving approximately 59 million meals.
Local Produce Link (LPL), a farm-to-food pantry program gets fresh produce to low-income communities. Last year, area farmers delivered 280,868 pounds (75% organic) of harvested produce to 49 participating pantries.
Annually, UWNYC runs 12–15 workshops that train over 250 representatives from emergency food program sites in food protection, pantry management and cooking with fresh produce to improve the health and nutrition status of people needing food assistance.
Operation support funding, including capital equipment, is key to the success of our emergency food program partners. Last year, this funding supplied vital resources such as food service paper and disposable products, transportation, staff cost, utilities and space, as well as staple kitchen equipment, including freezers, refrigerators and stoves.
UWNYC creates support networks between community-d organizations and New Yorkers in need. Last year, our Emergency Food and Shelter Program (EFSP) and our Food Support Connections (FSC) program allocated $5.2 million of federal, state, corporate and private funding toward the immediate and long-term food and housing stability of our neighbors.
In partnership with New York State and seven community-d organizations, FSC provides resources for individuals and families to get screened for and enroll in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. Last year, FSC distributed over $1.4 million to New Yorkers living in food-insecure households. SNAP has generated more than $276 million in economic activity for New York City’s under-resourced communities.
EFSP supplements the work of pantries, kitchens and shelters assisting New York City residents who are facing economic emergency. In 2013–14, EFSP directly funded 183 agencies that aided 300 emergency food and shelter programs. Of this funding, nearly $800,000 in emergency rent, mortgage and utility assistance helped families and individuals prevent homelessness.
Designed as a unified pilot initiative across four markets in the Tri-State Region, UWNYC launched CollegePath in July 2013 to provide a lifeline to low-to-moderate income (LMI) families to help them afford their child's college education. CollegePath employed a coordinated data-driven strategy that gave LMI families the asset-building and money-management skills needed to meet the financial demands of college educations. CollegePath especially served families enrolled in our GPS-NYC program.
UWNYC awarded the Women’s Center for Education and Career Advancement (WCECA) $75,000 to develop the Self-Sufficiency Standard Report, which examined how much income NYC households of diverse composition and location need to make ends meet. UWNYC sat influentially on the report’s steering committee to drive and shape the analysis and policy recommendations.
UWNYC’s Capacity Building team helped strengthen the community-d organizations across education, income and health around the city. Our BoardServeNYC program, together with investment in the Change Capital Fund and other learning opportunities, extended crucial infrastructure support and strategic guidance to fellow nonprofits.

Last year, our small grants helped cover and defray costs for partner organizations to attend nonprofit sector conferences, allowing staff at all levels to learn best practices in the social and human services sector. Sponsorships for the Staten Island Not-for-Profit Association Annual Nonprofit Capacity Building Conference and the Better Business Bureau’s annual symposium brought more than 200 nonprofit leaders together professional development opportunities.
Through placement support, customized coaching sessions and training workshops, UWNYC placed 78 new boards members onto 58 nonprofit boards, strengthened board governance practices for 92 boards and 247 board members, and educated 193 potential board candidates. These efforts impacted the organizational infrastructure of 133 NYC nonprofits.
As an active member of the Change Capital Fund collaborative, UWNYC’s $75,000 contribution assisted five community development organizations upgrade their strategies and develop new business models to address persistent poverty more effectively. Additional Technical Assistance helped each initiative identify the tracking systems they would need to better understand and demonstrate their results.
UWNYC provided $1,788,274 to 25 grantees in Brooklyn, Manhattan, Staten Island and Queens to rebuild the capacities of community-d organization partners in Coney Island, the Rockaways, St. George, Port Richmond, Graniteville, New Dorp Beach, Richmond Parkway, City Hall, Midtown and Red Hook.
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